I Won the Lottery!!!

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The New York City Marathon lottery that is!

The TCS New York City Marathon is the largest and one of the most popular marathons in the world. Every year around 50,000 people finish this marathon, and exactly eight months from today, I will be one of those people!!

Qualifying for the NYC Marathon is no easy feat. There are three ways to get into this marathon: through guaranteed entry, their charity program or their lottery. Guaranteed entry methods include qualifying by time, getting grandfathered in by finishing 15 previous New York City Marathons, or running nine qualifying races as a New York Road Runners member the year before each year’s marathon. You can also gain entry by running and fundraising with one of the marathon’s registered charity partners.

The final way to qualify is through a lottery drawing. Last year, the TCS New York City Marathon held the biggest general-entry lottery drawing in the event’s 40-year history, accepting 19,083 runners out of 82,172 applicants. That’s still less than a 25% chance of being chosen, and I got in!

I ran my first and only half marathon in Phoenix, Arizona in 2011. It was something I had always wanted to do and I ended up dedicating my run to Hunter Halvorson, who was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) at just 2 ½ years old. (As of November Hunter has officially been classified as CURED!). I finished the half marathon in 2:03:26, just 3 ½ minutes past my goal, and I was able to raise almost $1300 in donations for the Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

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About a year and a half ago, my coworker and good friend, Emily changed my life by introducing me to The Ronan Foundation. As a mother, learning about the reality of childhood cancer hit my heart hard. It is a cause I have come to be extremely passionate about and I will forever fight to help raise awareness and find a cure for childhood cancer.

Before I got pregnant last year, I was getting the itch to run another race. I had always said if I were ever going to run a full marathon, I would want to run the NYC Marathon. I knew it would probably be the only marathon I would run in my lifetime, and I wanted to run in a place that meant something to me. I wanted to run in this magical city I have called home for the last eight years. I am not sure how much longer we will be calling NYC our home, so I knew I just had to find a way to run the NYC Marathon this year.

Naturally, I knew I wanted to run for Ronan and all of the other beautiful souls that have been affected by childhood cancer. I realized that in order to do that, I would need to win the lottery. A few days before registering, I went for my first run since Alwyn was born. As I was running, I said a prayer asking to be chosen in the lottery, so that I could run for the Ronan Foundation. I was aware that it was a long shot, but I just kept praying. On Thursday, the day of the drawing, I prayed all day. That night, as I laid down for bed, I checked my email. As soon as I saw it, I was instantly brought to tears. I just couldn’t believe my prayers had been answered. I was beyond excited.

I was also completely terrified. It was hard to imagine how I was ever going to find the time and energy to do this with my plate already being so full. But I will. I will find a way. I am going to do this. I have to. If so many young children can go through everything that they go through to fight for their lives, I can run 26.2 miles for them. I can and I will.

So, stay tuned for my fundraising page and wish me luck!!

Valerie Anne

3 Reasons I Decided to “Go Gold” AGAIN…In Public

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When I decided to make my first Be Bold, Go Gold video it was to support a good friend and her passion for The Ronan Thompson Foundation and childhood cancer awareness. My outlook has always been, if we can’t count on our closest friends and family to support us, then how can we expect to count on anyone else. As I began researching more about childhood cancer statistics and facts, my own passion for the cause began to grow. This, and these three other reasons are why I decided to “Go Gold” again, and this time in public.

1. It is changing my outlook on life.

If this experience has taught me one thing, it is to let go of the little things, while at the same time holding on to the simple moments in life.

I wish I could have recorded my husband’s face when he first saw all the gold glitter that covered our hardwood floor and area rug as I was making our gold tutus. I know he was biting his tongue from protesting too much. I used to hate glitter too. It’s annoying as all f***. But it didn’t matter this time. Because kids are dying of cancer. Mothers and fathers are being taken away from their children. The ones we love are leaving us too soon. When I thought about it this way, the glitter all over was a minuscule problem, and I even started to welcome it. There are still remnants all around our apartment, as well as my parent’s house. I love that it is a constant reminder to stop sweating the small stuff.

And it’s working! The other night Tyson was working late at the Ranger’s game, which meant it was just Qwynn and I for dinner. I made her mac n’ cheese, one of my favorite meals as a kid. We had a great conversation about her day at school, and I relished in the fact that she is at the age now that we can actually have these dinner talks. As I started cleaning up my plate, I noticed Qwynn was putting the last few noodles on each prong of her fork. As I looked at her messy, cheese covered hands, my first instinct was to tell her to stop playing with her food and finish eating her dinner. But I resisted.

I held back because my own memory of doing the same exact thing when I was little came flooding to the front of my mind. I thought, what’s the big deal? So she’s playing with her food and getting a little messy. At least she is here. She is alive and able to explore this wonderful world around her. That is what is important. It was then she noticed me watching her and she held her fork up and said “Look Mommy!” She was so proud of herself, and in that moment I felt proud and blessed to be her mom.

2. I had the opportunity to attend the Bloomingdales Runway Heroes Fashion Show.

The Bloomingdales Runway Heroes Fashion Show was only about 15 minutes long, but it was one of the most emotional 15 minutes I have had in my life. As I watched all these brave kids strutting their stuff on the runway, the feeling of compassion was so strong inside me. The hardest part was watching the first few kids come out being held by their parents. It instantly brought tears to my eyes. On the outside, they looked like completely normal moms and dads with their children. But I knew they weren’t. I knew that they were dealing with something no parent or child should have to endure and it was honestly heartbreaking.

I just couldn’t help but think…that child could be one of my many nieces or nephews. That child could be any one of the children I take care of everyday at work. That child could be one of the countless kids I see walking through the streets of New York City. And the saddest realization of all, that child could be my precious and beautiful Qwynn Jolee.

Halfway through the fashion show Tyson texted me this picture and message and I just lost it inside.

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This horrible thing, childhood cancer, could become any one of our realities at any moment, without any warning. When I began to think about it this way, I just couldn’t stand back and watch. I HAD to do something else.

3. I wanted and felt the need to do more.

I was really proud of my first video and felt truly blessed that I got to share the experience with my sister, nieces and daughter. But even after getting so much positive feedback for it, I still felt like I could’ve done more. I felt that I could’ve tried harder to reach more people. I started brainstorming ideas and began building the courage to go out in public and talk to people about childhood cancer awareness.

At first, I didn’t even consider doing it by myself. I wanted my friend Emily to help me with my idea, but the timing just wasn’t working out. I wanted to do something now! But how could I do it by myself? It couldn’t be possible.

But it was.

It was very possible. It was possible because I have the most supportive husband and most fun-loving and courageous daughter. It was possible because I couldn’t stop thinking about all those kids whose lives were cut short. All those moms who don’t get to dance and be silly and laugh with their little ones anymore. It is possible because I would want people to do the same for me if it were my daughter.

It is possible because if we don’t speak up and do something for each others’ kids, then the horrible reality of childhood cancer is never going to change. It needs to change and we can all do something to help.

Be Bold and Stay Gold!

Valerie Anne

3 Reasons I Decided to “Go Gold” for Childhood Cancer

1. I am a mom.

I’ve always been somewhat of a worry wart. In most situations, I let my mind wander to every possible outcome, often negative. This is something I am working everyday to change about myself. A part of me feels so blessed for everything that I have in my life, that sometimes I am left wondering, when is my luck going to change?

Being a mom was something I’ve wanted my whole life. Before I became pregnant I often worried that I wouldn’t be able to even become pregnant. My mother had trouble conceiving, so I always knew it was possible that I could have the same problems. When I ended up getting pregnant fairly quickly, I worried constantly throughout my pregnancy. I was researching everything and anything I put in or on my body, and although I had a relatively enjoyable pregnancy, the responsibility was scary.

The day Qwynn was born was one of the happiest, most long awaited days of my life. I never imagined all the emotions that would flood through me holding my little baby girl for the first time. Remembering that moment makes it even harder to imagine the pain and emotions someone goes through when they lose a child, especially one so young. My heart truly aches for all those moms that have lost their babies, no matter what the cause. I may have never had a child with cancer, but I do know the love a mom has for her child and I don’t know what I would do if mine was ever taken from me.

When I looked up The Ronan Thompson Foundation for the first time, I was mesmerized by this beautiful little boy with these amazing blue eyes that sparkled so bright. As a mother, I of course think my daughter is the most beautiful little human in the world, and I cannot even begin to imagine my life without her.

2. I was inspired by an amazing friend. 

I have some pretty amazing coworkers and friends who inspire me to think about things that I otherwise would have probably never thought about. I still remember when my friend Emily first told me about Ronan. Her love and compassion for a little boy she never even met was absolutely fascinating to me. Her courage and passion to do anything to help raise awareness for more childhood cancer research is definitely contagious.  I may not have been as brave as her to run all around NYC telling people about the lack of funding for childhood cancer, but only for Emmy would I cover my face in gold glitter and record myself dancing for anyone to see.

Something Emily has told me numerous times in our conversations about childhood cancer has really stuck with me…If these little kids can fight cancer, if they are brave enough to fight for their lives everyday, then there is no reason I, as an adult, can’t do something that is uncomfortable or scary to me.

I have not and will never forget this.

3. I wanted to step outside my comfort zone.

Pretty much since I can remember I’ve been a shy person. I am super critical of myself and wonder what other people are thinking about me way more than I should. I get super anxious in social situations, especially large groups.  I didn’t have a lot of friends in school and I’ve never found it easy to talk to new people.

Although I wasn’t able to get out there and personally talk to people about childhood cancer, what I loved about this challenge is that it did get me to step outside my comfort zone. It forced me to simply let go.  I didn’t worry about making a fool of myself on video. I didn’t worry about what other people might think about me putting this out there. I simply relished in the feeling of acting like a kid again. A feeling that all kids should be able to experience. The feeling of running around my parents backyard, bare feet in the grass, dancing with my nieces, sister and daughter.  It is an experience I will carry with me for the rest of my life.

Valerie Anne